Dr AL Sharada
Jun 22, 2020

Creative Critique from a gender lens: 15-21 June

Dr AL Sharada, director, Population First, reviews a selection of ads from last week

Dr Sharada reviews six ads
Dr Sharada reviews six ads
Airtel

No comment
 
Axis Bank
 

This ad is a much-needed reminder to be compassionate in a time when we see some of us, who can afford to pay, refusing to pay salaries to our housing and maintenance staff or not chipping in to support the homeless and people in need. The worst hit in the pandemic are the small vendors who provide for our daily needs and with whom we often share a special bond.  The bank is asking its clients to keep the account live with these neighbourhood vendors by paying them in advance for products and services that  they may avail from them in future. Thus, it highlights the importance of  treating   them with dignity and respect in their times of need. However, I wish they had  given greater visibility to women in the visuals. I would rate the ad 5/5 on sensitivity in the Covid context, but in terms of gender inclusiveness it could have been better.
 
GS Score: 3.5/5
 
Manforce Condoms
 
 
A humorous ad that brings out the chemistry between the couple very well and is subtle in its communication. However, the whole initiative seems to be driven by the man alone. I am sure a young woman may also feel aroused by her man being beside her 24x7 during lockdown! Just a thought!
 
GS Score 3.5/5
 
Myntra
 
No comment.
 
Saregama Carvaan
 
Once again a sensitive ad focusing on the isolation and loneliness of elderly people during the corona times. 
 
GS Score: 3/5
 
Snickers
 
The ad projects the Covid warriors as the new role models, thus acknowledging their immense contribution to Covid response. However, the ad is stereotypical to an extent. It shows a woman aspiring to be nurse and a young man aspiring to be a doctor which is very steretypical. There are many male nurses as well in the health system and a recent study has shown that more men are  joining nursing profession today as compared to earlier years. Maintaining gender balance and avoiding stereotypes is important to question the power equations between men and women. As we all know doctors are better paid, and occupy more powerful position than nurses and if we show always men as doctors and women as nurses, not only are we gender stereotyping occupations and the power equations that exist but also inadvertently  limiting the  aspirations of women.
 
GS Score: 2.75/5
 
Source:
Campaign India