Campaign India Team
May 03, 2010

Anant's blog: Find a solution to the Abbys

We've reported and commented on the last three Abbys. It's never been pleasant. If the Luxor controversy left a bad taste in the mouth, this year's controversy is a monster. What is clear is that there are many things wrong with the awards. Balki doesn't take part. Prasoon is being polite about it, but doesn't respect it enough to take part, either. This year, Ravi Deshpande decided to give it a miss. Things aren't good. 

Anant's blog: Find a solution to the Abbys

We've reported and commented on the last three Abbys. It's never been pleasant.
 
If the Luxor controversy left a bad taste in the mouth, this year's controversy is a monster.
 
What is clear is that there are many things wrong with the awards.
 
Balki doesn't take part. Prasoon is being polite about it, but doesn't respect it enough to take part, either. This year, Ravi Deshpande decided to give it a miss.
 
Things aren't good.
 
Each year, we see (literally, through comments on the site and through mails and text messages we receive), winners being abused and defiled by readers. The comments on the last three posts on the Abbys - Colvyn's reaction to the ET report on Goafest, on the need of a statement from the Ad Club  and the first story on the Abby controversy, include a large number of personal attacks (Pops should retire, I should retire, etc).
 
Good fun? No.
 
When we decided on a policy of unmoderated comments on our dotcom, we thought it would result in healthy and constructive debate. There is a bit of that, but a lot of the comments are aimed at settling personal scores rather than argue on the merits and demerits of a particular issue.
 
It is obvious that many of our readers, and, by extension, many of the professionals in advertising, feel very strongly on the Abbys and everything concerned with it.
 
So this time, could all of you try to contribute to cleaning up the mess rather than get into personal wars of words?
 
Let the larger industry know what is wrong with the Abbys. Make suggestions on what could be done to make this a credible, sought after award. Comment on others' opinions and comments. Argue and counter-argue. Make this a story that the Ad Club and the AAAI read intesely and interestedly when they sit down to discuss the future of the Abbys.
 
And this time, please stay away from personalities, however tempting the thought.
 
To paraphrase John F Kennedy Jr, ask not what your industry can do for you, ask what you can do for your industry.

Source:
Campaign India