Campaign India Team
Jan 06, 2009

What an idea, Balki!

Less than a month since this campaign for Idea Cellular broke.  And here’s a case of life imitating art (or is advertising a science?): Rahul Gandhi decides that he needs to know what bothers the minds of the youth of India.

What an idea, Balki!

Less than a month since this campaign for Idea Cellular broke.
 
And here’s a case of life imitating art (or is advertising a science?): Rahul Gandhi decides that he needs to know what bothers the minds of the youth of India.

So he will (shortly) announce a number that anyone can reach him through SMS – or even a phone call.
 
Today’s Mumbai Mirror reports “Here’s you chance to speak your heart out to the AICC general secretary Rahul Gandhi. You can call him, text him and that too direct! Seems impossible, doesn’t it?

The youth icon is working on a call centre idea so that he can be accessible to every youth in the country without any hindrance. The novel idea will be executed soon and is being implemented by a Bangalore-based friend of Rahul.”
 
Terrific. Except that he also says he will read all the messages himself.
 
In an advertisement, exaggeration is a license, so when you see Lowe’s TVC for Idea, you smile. When Rahul Gandhi says he will read all the messages, it gets reduced to a publicity stunt.
 
It’s a good day for Indian advertising when a piece of communication inspires well intentioned imitation. And it must be a great day for all at Lowe and Idea Cellular.

Source:
Campaign India

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