Dr AL Sharada
Mar 26, 2021

Creative critique from a gender lens: 15-19 March

Dr AL Sharada, director, Population First, reviews a selection of ads from last week

Creative critique from a gender lens: 15-19 March

A very male-centric ad. Is the IPL only for boys? And is the greed for success only a male attribute? While it is understandable that IPL is associated with MS Dhoni, Virat Kohli and Rohit Sharma, it would have been so much better to have girls also among the children.
 
GS Score: 2.5/5
 

It’s interesting to see that the ad includes a dusky-complexioned girl. We need to see women and girls of various body types and complexions in ads, more often.
 
GS Score: 3/5
 

Once again, the communication is very male-centric and puts the onus of saving and investing, on men alone.
 
GS Score: 2/5
 

A humorous ad that rests on many stereotypes - a disapproving wife, a boss conscious of his position and a very pleasing junior employee. A very stereotypical presentation.
 
GS Score: 2/5
 

Why is it that it is always boys who are shown as throwing tantrums about food and mothers fussing over them? I think the male sense of entitlement stems from here. One of the major reasons behind wife-beating is with the wife not being to cook well or to the liking of her husband. Also, vitamin supplements are supplements. They are no substitute for nutritious food.
 
GS Score: 2/5
 

An interesting ad that reverses the roles and shows a sulking man and a determined woman trying to make up after a fight.
 
GS Score: 3.25/5
 
 

A typical macho man ad to the core.
 
GS Score: 2/5
 

Though a Vitamin D deficiency is universal, the representation of women is limited to one character in this ad. However, it is interesting to note the final voice over is of a woman; often, the voice of authority is projected as that of a man.
 
GS score: 3.25/5
 

Portrays a very stereotypical family.
 
GS Score: 2/5
 

 
 
A series of ads that captures a spectrum of people using the Spotify app. Shows a woman driving a car, a man sweeping the floor and another making tea. It is this normalisation of non-stereotypical behaviours which would bring about change.
 
GS Score 3.5/5
Source:
Campaign India

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