Campaign India Team
Feb 03, 2009

Anant's Blog: Missing 47% of the opportunity

Not too long ago, I used to head the TBWA Mumbai and Pune offices.It was a difficult time for the agency, having lost the hugely prestigious and profitable Frooti and Parakh Foods accounts. Finolex Cables was dormant, there were no billings from IndianOil though we were on the panel and it was already October.We won the Fosters account (from what I gather O&M no longer wished to work on the account, it was too small) in November with a presentation that saw only PoP, menus and tent cards.

Anant's Blog: Missing 47% of the opportunity

Not too long ago, I used to head the TBWA Mumbai and Pune offices.

It was a difficult time for the agency, having lost the hugely prestigious and profitable Frooti and Parakh Foods accounts. Finolex Cables was dormant, there were no billings from IndianOil though we were on the panel and it was already October.

We won the Fosters account (from what I gather O&M no longer wished to work on the account, it was too small) in November with a presentation that saw only PoP, menus and tent cards.

A month or two later, we won the CNBC account, presenting only outdoor and print.

In December, Finolex cleared a campaign after ages. Only print.

In February, we won the first big business from IndianOil, this time print and TV.

Halfway into the next year, we won the BPL Mobile account from McCann – presenting only print and BTL.

We had an office which was in love with print – and we were making money all over again.

Print and BTL were our entry points to recovery.

Print and BTL may not be sexy, but they’re terrific in difficult times – such as we’re going through today.

They don’t necessarily give you large chunks of billings, but they give you continuous small chunks – and it all adds up, as we once saw at TBWA.

You sneer, as many colleagues and peers did when I was at TBWA, and you go back to your scripts and storyboards that clients will look at a hundred times harder than they did a year ago.

Perhaps I’ll let Sam Balsara do the batting for me. This, a quote from the Pitch-Madison Advertising Outlook 2009:

Print continues to hold the largest share of pie at 47%, although Print did seem to lose steam in 2nd half of 2008 and lost a 1% share compared to 2007.

TV is a close no. 2 with 41% of the advertising pie and has gained a 1% share compared to 2007.


Print accounts for 47% of the adex pie, and there’s hardly a creative who wants to work on it. That’s 47% of the potential revenues that you’re ignoring.

Chew on that one.

Source:
Campaign India

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